Lucille Bliss, voice of Smurfette, dies at 96

November 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Lucille Bliss, the voice actress whose 60-year career including starring as Smurfette in the 1980s animated series “The Smurfs,” has died. She was 96.

Bliss died Nov. 8 of natural causes at an assisted living center in Costa Mesa, Calif., the Orange County coroner told the Los Angeles Times.

Bliss worked steadily up until the time of her death after getting her start in 1950 with a voice role in Disney’s “Cinderella” as the stepsister Anastasia. Her big break came with the title role in the original”Crusader Rabbit,” which was the first animated series to be produced specifically for television. The show, which originally aired on NBC from 1950-52, was co-created by Jay Ward of “Rocky and Bullwinkle” and “Dudley Do-Right” fame.

Bliss later voiced the original Elroy in the 1960s TV series “The Jetsons” (she reportedly lost that job when she refused to work under a stage name to cover up the fact the she was a woman voicing a little boy) as well as characters in “The Flintstones” and animated “Star Wars” spinoffs.

But she will perhaps be best remembered as the voice of Smurfette in the beloved ’80s series. The character, as voiced by Bliss, also appeared in several TV movies and specials throughout the decade. (Katy Perry voiced the character in the 2011 big-screen version along with its upcoming sequel.)

More recently, she had voice roles in the movie “Robots” and the TV series “Avatar: The Last Airbender.”

Bliss was born March 31, 1916, in New York to Frieda Siemens, a classically trained pianist who wanted Bliss to train as an opera singer, and James Francis Bliss. After her father died in 1928, she and her mother moved to San Francisco, where Bliss took acting lessons. She later borrowed $50 to move to Los Angeles for the “Cinderella” audition.

Bliss never married and has no immediate survivors.

A memorial service will be held at 1:30 p.m. Nov. 20 at Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles.



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Sony Pictures ready to make threequel to ‘Smurfs’

May 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Even before the release of their upcoming “Smurfs” sequel, Sony Pictures Animation and Columbia Pictures are feeling very confident and are already developing a script for “Smurfs 3” with “Over the Hedge” duo writers Karey Kirkpatrick and Chris Poche.

Released last summer, “The Smurfs”, based on the Belgian comic, did well at the box-office worldwide. Sony wasted no time announcing a sequel, waiting all of 12 days before setting a July 31, 2013 release for “Smurfs 2.”

The Sequel will see the return of director Raja Gosnell, producer Jordan Kerner and executive producer Ezra Swerdlow. Even most of the original cast has been retained for the sequel – Neil Patrick Harris, Jayma Mays and Hank Azaria. New cast members include Brendan Gleeson, J.B. Smoove as a naughty smurf named Hackus and Christina Ricci as Vexy, an evil version of Smurfette played by Katy Perry.



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‘Smurfs’ vs. ‘Cars 2’: Who’s Winning the Toy Wars?

August 17, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Look for a crush of little blue characters — say, a plush 14-inch talking Clumsy Smurf wearing a designer T-shirt — to invade the holidays this year. As The Smurfs did better at the box office than anticipated, Smurf toys have been dancing into consumers’ carts.

“Smurfs is selling through very well,” says Jeremy Padawer, executive vp marketing and business development at Jakks Pacific, the Malibu-based toy manufacturer with the master license for The Smurfs.

Competing against two of the biggest toy-related franchises ever — Cars and Transformers — Smurfs has broken out in what is arguably the most competitive summer in movie history for blockbuster family movies that generate domestic and international licensing and retail merchandising revenue. This summer served up 17 films that amount to toy business bait, including Thor, Captain America: The First Avenger, X-Men: First Class, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, Green Lantern and Winnie the Pooh — up from the 10 or so in previous summers.

Jakks Pacific, with revenue last year of $747 million, competes against industry giants Mattel and Hasbro (with $5.9 billion and $4 billion in 2010 sales, respectively). The largest merchandising program in history is being staged for Cars 2 by Disney, which expects the Pixar movie to surpass the Toy Story 3 licensing bonanza last year of $2.8 billion sales and to eclipse Star Wars: Episode III — Revenge of the Sith record in 2005 of $3.5 billion in retail. Meanwhile, Hasbro is making a competitive marketing blitz for Transformers: Dark of the Moon with 350 licensees, well above the 250 for Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen in 2009.

The nostalgia-driven success of Smurfs could be the kind of holy grail for the licensing world that all these franchises are seeking. It’s the moment when the franchise becomes timeless and the toys continue to move independent of box office.

Those few franchises are the only ones that Lego looks to license for the “construction category.” Their current lineup includes Harry Potter, Pirates of the Caribbean, Cars, Toy Story, Winnie the Pooh and Star Wars, the reigning king of toy licenses.

“We’re taking properties that don’t rely on the box office because the peaks and valleys that come with that kind of business model are pretty tough to manage in the marketplace,” says Michael McNally, Lego’s U.S. brand relations director. “If something only sells for three weeks out of the year, when it has big box office, then drops off completely as some properties do, that’s not sustainable. So we look for properties that have a timeless quality attached to the characters.”

No property in the modern era better exemplifies sustainability than Star Wars, which remains a top seller even though there hasn’t been a new movie since 2008 (although there have been new TV shows). NPD ranks Star Wars as the fourth biggest seller this year and the top movie license entering summer. “Year in and year out Star Wars is popular,” says Toys R Us’s senior PR manager Bob Friedland.

Summer is only the opening salvo in the toy wars. About a third of the year’s business will be done before Labor Day. The other two thirds of movie merchandise sales will be in the rest of the year, mostly in December. This summer the biggest displays in Kmart, Target, Wal-Mart and Toys R Us have been for Cars 2 and Transformers.

The success of the Smurfs, however, is a signal for retailers as to how to prepare for the holidays. That is why by this Christmas Papa Smurf and Smurfette expect to be sharing more shelf space and front of store visibility with Lightning McQueen and Bummblebee the Autobot.

“It’s really about having the toys the kids want when they want them,” says Friedland. “They know the personalities they’ve seen in movies and on TV.”

The stakes are huge. The research firm NPD says licensed toys and games generated $6.3 billion in retail sales through the beginning of July, a one% increase over the same period a year ago.

The results this summer have already boosted Hasbro and Mattel, who both credit movie related sales for higher second quarter 2011 financial results. For the full year analyst Edward Woo of Wedbush Securities estimates Transformers will add $700 million in sales to Hasbro and Cars 2 will pad Mattel revenues by $500 million.

Although Cars 2 has more display space in stores and more products, Hasbro benefits because it doesn’t just license Transformers, it owns the rights to the property first invented in Japan. That means they control the TV version, video releases and don’t share product licenses and merchandising revenues with anyone else.

Drew Crumb and David Pang in a June research report for Stifel Nicolaus explained the difference: “Hasbro does NOT share the Transformers toy IP (intellectual property) with other toy manufacturers so we still think the Transformers line should post one of the biggest sales figures for an individual toy manufacturer in ’11.”

It used to be that toy sales were gravy for studios like Paramount, Sony and Disney. But these days licensing can be as lucrative as the movie box office and producers count on that to cover costs which often exceed $150 million.

“Licensed merchandising is no longer a side show,” says Kerry Phellan, head of consumer products for DreamWorks Animation and formerly of Pixar. “It is now part of a business problem and whatever they count on has to be there in order to get the revenue needed to cover the issue, expense and all this marketing.”

The shift in the role of licensing can be traced to 2000 when Disney first established a franchise management team, a move Andy Mooney, Chairman, Disney Consumer Products Worldwide, said at an investors conference in February was “truly a game-changer.”

Mooney said that was when Disney began a “uniquely active approach to licensing.”
What he means is that until 2000, they had just focused on deal making while providing minimal input. “Passive licensing is a highly efficient business model in terms of (profit) margin,” Mooney told investors, “but it’s also highly ineffective at creating sustained growth.”

So Disney with Cars 2 was actively managing not just the licensing, but also creation of more than 300 toys, down to the product mix at key retail outlets. For Toys R Us, for example, they coordinated 20 different licensees to provide 70 exclusive items.
For the wooden toy category Disney couldn’t find a licensee they liked so they designed their own line using a private label supplier to execute and deliver the products.

This aggressive form of product line management, Mooney said, is “unique to entertainment industry licensing and it has really been a key contributor to growth at (Disney) over the last decade.”

So for Cars 2 that meant making an extra special effort to create characters that serve the movie but also work for retail. “They did an amazing job inventing that world for us,” says Doug Wadleigh, Mattel’s senior vp, global entertainment. “Within the film there are over 600 new characters, many in the background, but they provide a wealth of opportunities to create toys from.”

Movie toy and game royalties averaged 9.4% last year, according to Licensing Letter publisher Ira Mayer, adding: “Cars 2 is going to get several points beyond that because they can command a premium.”

Stifel Nicolaus estimates Cars 2 commanded a lofty 15% royalty.

That premium is largely because the brand will continue even after the movie is released in theaters and home video. By Disney’s estimate since the original Cars in 2005, consumer product sales have exceeded $10 billion – before Cars 2.

Sales have been strong even though the movie hasn’t performed as well as many of the other Pixar hits in theaters or with critics. Global ticket sales are just over $400 million worldwide, compared to over $1 billion for Toy Story 3 last year. And Cars 2 has only a 38% approval from critics on Rotten Tomatoes, the lowest for any Pixar movie. Toy Story 3 had 99% approval.

However, Cars has something else going for it in terms of toys. Its appeal is that it turned something kids did anyway into a licensable franchise. “Kids were already collecting die cast cars, and playing with them,” says Friedland, “but it gave a very friendly personality to these vehicles.”

That is also an attribute that has helped Hasbro. “Transformers is a classic play pattern for boys,” says Mayer. “It tests well outside the movie. In fact, Hasbro says the toys are really about a franchise and not connected to the movie, although particular toys are. It’s about the whole idea of Transformers.”

Not every movie becomes a franchise, as Smurfs aspires to be, and some even fail to generate toy sales. The Universal release Hop sold movie tickets at Easter but not many licensed toys. Weinstein Company’s Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil didn’t sell tickets or toys.

Universal’s 1990 Jetson’s feature famously grossed only $20 million domestically despite name recognition, huge marketing, fast food tie ins and extensive licensing. It was the retailers who made a huge bet on the associated toy line upfront that had to bear the brunt of the losses.

Another disappointment was the early sales of Harry Potter toys when the franchise first launched 11 years ago. The movies have continued to be big hits but Warner Bros. stopped licensing kids’ toys after the third movie, Prisoner of Azkaban in 2004. They dropped licenses with Mattel and trading cards from Hasbro and now say that the content of the movies “aged up” and were no longer for little kids.

So now Potter-mania is aimed at those seeking high end collectables (including art, figurines, and prop replicas) to adult collectors, So you can find Potter collectables at FAO Schwartz from scarf’s, lunch boxes and hats to Hogwarts Castle for $149.99 but not nearly as much at Toys R Us (which owns FAO Schwartz).

Mayer said there was another problem: “J.K. Rowling was very specific in limiting how much merchandise there could be, so there was never an array of merchandise you would expect from that kind of movie.”

Warner’s did recently license Harry Potter Jelly Belly candy; and Lego has had a Potter license since 2001 and has found success with it. “I think being able to build the scenes from the movie which are so fantasy based is awesome for anybody who has watched the movies,” says McNally. “It’s a story that appeals to both boys and girls, and mini figure versions of the characters are always collectable so we have had an adult audience as well.”

Some movies succeed by limiting what they license on purpose. DreamWorks Animation had success earlier this year with Kung Fu Panda 2, without licensing construction toys, for instance.

DreamWorks saw stuffed animals from Mattel’s Fisher Price division as “a natural extension of what we know fans love,” says Phelan. “We know they are going to want to take home a piece of the movie and our films have the benefit of being largely unisexual and equally exploit in gender appeal so we obviously do figural play so boys can live out the action and girls may want a more cute cuddly plush toy.”

One trend in toys is toward high tech and Phelan said they sought digital connections. “We had great success with our mobile game ap,” said Phelan. “During the movie (release) window it was the number one mobile game ap for kids and number one on the Ipad for kids.”

Green Lantern fell below expectations in theaters but toy sales were robust. “Kids don’t worry about what’s doing well at the box office,” said Friedland, who says it benefited from years as a comic book. “They just want to play with toys made for characters they like. You also have collectors interested in these toys.”

Now that The Smurfs has exceeded expectations, Jakks is trying to meet the demand from retailers and strategize how to make it into a franchise with legs. However, the surprise success presents a logistical challenge. “When you’re dealing with an event based property, where you don’t necessarily have retail’s immediate understanding of the potential impact,” says Padawer, “chasing it right away is really difficult for a manufacturer because it takes 100 days to order materials and another 20 days to ship it from Hong Kong.”

The goal of creating a lasting franchise is what drives Hollywood and retailers. “Clearly we want to maximize the property when it’s on the big screen,” says Mattel’s Wadleigh, “but it’s more important for us to bring our brand management skills to it to make sure that brand, that property, stays on the shelf long after its life on the big screen.”



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Apes beat Smurfs at UK box office

August 17, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Rupert Wyatt’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes has beaten The Smurfs to top the UK and Ireland box office, taking £5.8m on its opening weekend.

3D movie The Smurfs, featuring the voices of actors including Neil Patrick Harris, entered at two with £3.8m.

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 2 was third with £1.7m, after four weeks at number one.

The new episode in the Apes franchise stars James Franco as a scientist looking for an Alzheimer’s cure.

Rise of the Planet of the Apes tells the tale of Will Rodman and his experiments on CGI chimp Caesar, played by British actor Andy Serkis. When the ape ends up at a sanctuary for primates, events escalate out of control.

Speaking to the BBC, director Wyatt said the film was “a Spartacus story”.

“It’s a few apes rising up against their oppressors, but after that it’s an escape movie, it’s them trying to find paradise.”

Rise of the Planet of the Apes is also top of the US and Canada box office, after taking $27.5m (£16.9m).

Part-animated film The Smurfs also features the voice of stars including The Simpsons’ Hank Azaria, singer Katy Perry and comedian George Lopez.

Sci-fi mystery Super 8 dropped two places to number four, with £1.2m, while family comedy Mr Popper’s Penguins dropped two to number five, taking £897,336.



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The Smurfs, not Rise of the Planet of the Apes, rules the box-office in Quebec

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Across North America, the No. 1 movie on the weekend was Rise of the Planet of the Apes, which out-did expectations and swung in $54 million at cash registers across the continent. But here in Quebec – where we just love being different – the top draw at movie-theatres was none other than The Smurfs.

Or should I say Les Schtroumpfs? That’s the title of the French version of the Hollywood animated feature and is of course the original name for these odd little blue creatures. They had a funny French name for the very good reason that they were created by Belgian cartoonist Peyo aka Pierre Culliford.

The neat thing here is that the Smurfs picture is doing gangbusters business in non-English countries because of its Euro roots – it made $6.7 million on the weekend in Brazil and another $5.9 million in France. Here in la belle province, The Smurfs/Schtroumpfs has rung-up $2.6 million at the cash register in two weeks, including $676,851 this past weekend. The Apes prequel, in comparison, made $610,232 in its first weekend in Quebec cinemas.

Clearly The Smurfs is doing great here because franco Quebecers identify with the Belgian cartoon, though it doesn’t hurt that local pop vedette Marie-Mai lends her voice to one of the smurfs in the Quebec version.

Kudos to Le Journal de Montreal for the headline of the day – Ca schtroumpfe au box-office. Though I also like the headline, Les Schtroumpfs battent les singes!

My pal Stephane Giroux weighed in on Facebook to quite correctly note that we here in Quebec have been reading, and loving, Les Schtroumpfs comics since the 1960s while the Americans only found about The Smurfs in the 1980s. All of which goes a long way toward explaining what happened at the box office chez nous on the weekend.

Some might find the dominance of The Smurfs at the Quebec box office depressing. Me I find it funny….and kind of charming. Turns out our distinct society prefers little blue men and women to computer-generated apes. Cool.



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A ‘Smurfs’ sequel is coming in 2013

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Movie audiences have embraced “The Smurfs,” despite the best efforts of the film critic community. And as a result, we all get to smurf our way through a second movie.

Deadline reports that a sequel to the recent Neil-Patrick-Harris-meets-blue-gnomes movie has been set for a release date of Aug. 2, 2013. Given the recent announcements about the 2014 release dates for “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” and “Catching Fire,” the sequel to “The Hunger Games,” this qualifies as short notice. But hopefully people can still clear some space on their summer-movie calendars two years from now.

So, just to recap: in the past two days, we’ve established that the soundtrack for the remake of “Footloose,” an ‘80s movie, has gotten all twanged up; Lionsgate is remaking “Dirty Dancing,” another ‘80s-era film beloved by anyone who ever had a romantic fantasy set to the tune of “De todo un poco”; and Sony is launching a sequel to “The Smurfs,” a family comedy inspired by the azure cartoon characters also made popular during the 1980s.

If, by some chance, a remake of “The Breakfast Club” and/or a sequel to 2005’s “The Dukes of Hazzard” is announced later this week, civilization will finally collapse in a massive, original-idea-deficient heap. Assuming, you know, you don’t think that’s happened already.



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The Smurfs Movie Review

August 1, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

The Smurfs cartoons were a daily presence in my life growing up. It originally aired from 1981-1989 with 420 episodes and I would watch many of these every day, especially on weekends and summer vacation. Looking back, its no wonder that my parents never watched this with me because of the ubiquitous “La la la lala lalalala,” that I’m sure would drive any adult a little nuts.

The Smurfs are magically transported to New York City via a portal on the day of the Blue Moon festival. Clumsy Smurf (Anton Yelchin) accidentally leads Gargamel and his cat Azrael into the hidden Smurf village wherein chaos ensues after the sorcerer begins to start destroying their homes while trying to capture the tiny little blue men. Clumsy, being Clumsy, gets separated from the rest of the Smurfs causing Papa (Jonathan Winters), Smurfette (Katy Perry), Grouchy (George Lopez), Brainy (Fred Armisen) and Gutsy (Alan Cumming) to go after him. In New York, they meet Patrick (Neil Patrick Harris) and Grace Winslow (Jayma Mays), a young couple expecting their first child. Patrick works for a cosmetic company headed by Odile (Sofia Vergara), and recently has a trial promotion as the Vice President of marketing. If he can please Odile then he gets to keep the job. Of course that isn’t easy with the Smurfs involved. They are well meaning little blue creatures but incredibly out of place in this modern world. Still as they try to find their way back home and stop Gargamel from capturing them and stealing their Smurf essence, audiences are imparted with some important lessons.

The 2011 film doesn’t quite pack the same entertainment punch as cartoon did my five-year-old self saw it back in the day, but if you are in that age group now and watched it this opening weekend you probably enjoyed yourself. I’ll admit that the physical comedy of the movie were the parts where I laughed with the five, seven, and ten year olds who were in the theater with me. Hank Azaria, who plays Gargamel the dimwitted sorcerer hunting for Smurfs, took the brunt of the falls, hits, tosses, and crashes. Azaria did a spot on job in his portrayal of Gargamel’s demeanor and movement, but I just couldn’t get over the voice. Of course there was no way it could be the same, but it just kept reminding me that it was Azaria playing Gargamel, not really Gargamel come to life. That being said, I’m biased and I’m sure the kids enjoyed it.

Harris and Mays gave decent performances, but to be honest I kept feeling like I was watching an episode of Glee and soon the two actors would burst into spontaneous singing. Mays plays Emma Pillsbury on the hit show and Harris guested as Bryan Ryan (he won an Emmy for outstanding guest actor in a comedy series for this role).

The voice acting caught me by surprise, as I had no idea that Lopez was playing Grouchy, which was quite fitting. My favorite had to be Cumming as Gutsy because for one I couldn’t recognize his voice and secondly, he had the best lines.

Still my favorite character in the entire film has to be Azrael the cat. It was the best comic relief and had the funniest expressions. Kudos to the voice actor, CGI team, and the animal trainer!

Bottom line – parents, your kids will enjoy it and children of the eighties I say stick to the cartoons.



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‘Smurfs,’ ‘Cowboys & Aliens’ tie at box office

August 1, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

“Cowboys & Aliens” had the heft of two popular genres going for it.

The film, one of the most expensive movies to be released this year, also boasted two Hollywood A-listers in veteran actors Harrison Ford and Daniel Craig. It was executive produced by Steven Spielberg and directed by “Iron Man’s” Jon Favreau, who in recent weeks has been exhaustively promoting the movie. And it was received well by the fanboy audience at Comic-Con International in San Diego, where it premiered late last month.

Despite all that, the film opened to disappointing ticket sales this weekend. In a surprise, “The Smurfs” – a critically panned live-action/computer-animated hybrid movie based on characters that originated more than 50 years ago – grossed far more than pre-release polling had indicated. As a result, on Sunday the studios behind the pictures estimated that each film would collect $36.2 million domestically by weekend’s end. Meanwhile, the weekend’s other new wide release, the adult romantic comedy “Crazy, Stupid, Love,” brought in a decent $19.3 million.

Nikki Rocco, the domestic distribution president for Universal Pictures – which released “Cowboys” – said the film was a “unique action movie with a bold concept and a great pedigree of filmmakers.”

“We took a shot with them to bring this movie to market,” she explained.

The film’s soft opening is no doubt a letdown for Universal as well as the picture’s other financial packers, DreamWorks and Relativity Media, who collectively spent about $163 million to produce the movie.

“Cowboys,” which is based on a little-read graphic novel about an alien invasion in the Old West, resonated most with an older crowd, as 63 percent of the audience was over the age of 30. Those who saw the film – 53 percent of whom were male – gave it an average grade of B, according to market research firm CinemaScore.

The movie performed about as well on its first weekend as “Super 8,” one of the only other movies to be released this summer with a largely original concept. That J.J. Abrams-directed film opened to $35.5 million in June and has since grossed $181.2 million worldwide, but its production budget was far less, topping out at about $50 million.

Meanwhile, “The Smurfs,” which features a gaggle of diminutive blue cartoon characters, now seems primed to follow in the footsteps of Fox’s hugely successful “Alvin and the Chipmunks” series, which also stars live actors alongside animated characters. The most recent film in that franchise, “Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel,” opened to $48.9 million domestically in 2009 and went on to gross $443.1 million worldwide. “The Smurfs” is already off to a better start than two similar films that were released in 2010, “Yogi Bear” and “Marmaduke,” both of which opened to less than $17 million.

“I don’t know why people underestimated this movie to such a degree. We were always very bullish on it,” Sony distribution President Rory Bruer said. “It has a huge following and not just with kids – there’s a nostalgia factor and a cool factor that is kind of making the film resonate for us.”

Audiences who saw “The Smurfs” this weekend loved it, assigning the PG-rated film an average grade of A-minus. Not surprisingly, the movie – which cost about $110 million to produce – appealed mostly to a family audience, as 65 percent of the crowd was composed of parents with their children. The film didn’t sell an overwhelming number of 3-D tickets, with about 45 percent of the crowd opting to see the film in the pricier format.

The Smurfs, originally conceived by a Belgian comic-book artist in 1958, rose to popularity stateside when they became the subject of a 1980s Saturday morning cartoon program. To make sure younger audiences were familiar with the older property, Sony teamed up with a handful of marketing partners including McDonald’s, Stauffer’s, Post and Toys R Us to advertise the movie. (McDonald’s featured Smurfs on its Happy Meals worldwide.)

Overseas, the film opened this weekend in seven foreign markets and collected $4.4 million. The movie performed best in Spain, where it grossed $3.9 million, marking the eighth-biggest opening of the year in that nation.

“Crazy, Stupid, Love,” in which a middle-aged man played by Steve Carell is taught how to pick up women after his wife leaves him, cost Warner Bros. about $45 million to make. The film, which also stars Ryan Gosling and has received largely positive reviews, was given an average grade of B-plus by those who saw it. The movie appealed most to a largely older crowd, as 71 percent of the audience was 25 or above.

“There’s always a lack of films toward the end of the summer for an older audience,” said Dan Fellman, president of domestic distribution for Warner Bros. “We always felt like they were waiting for something good to come out – and obviously, they were waiting.”

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/07/31/2339553/smurfs-cowboys-aliens-tie-at-box.html#ixzz1TjzcD1aY



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Katy Perry at The Smurfs in 3D Premiere Photos

July 25, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Katy Perry looked smurf-tastic Sunday afternoon at the world premiere of The Smurfs in 3D at New York’s Zeigfield Theatre. She celebrated her role as Smurfette wearing a pair of smurfy high-heels and a very smurfy white dress with her Smurfs character adorning the front.

Katy also had a Marilyn Monroe moment with that short white dress when the wind gusted through. Looks like Katy’s got a little bit of the Seven Year Itch!

Last month, the Spanish town of Juzcar was chosen for the film’s premiere in Spain, and the entire town was painted Smurf blue.

After the renovation, one resident of the town said, “We like the idea of being the Smurf village. Everyone is very excited.”

The Smurfs in 3D also stars Neil Patrick Harris and Hank Azaria, and features the voices of Perry, Alan Cumming, George Lopez, and celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck. The film opens Friday, July 29th.



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Y3.com – 9500+ Free Games

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